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Eran Eldar

If you don’t let it in, you don’t have to get it out: Thought preemption as a method to control unwanted thoughts

21 July, 2022

Trying to stop thinking unwanted, often repetitive thoughts is a familiar experience. However, being aware of such attempts implies that the thought has already reached consciousness. Can we preempt an unwanted thought from coming to mind in the first place?

Cognitive bias modification of inferential flexibility

Cognitive bias modification of inferential flexibility

5 July, 2022

Are things not going well right now? Having a bad day?

When people experience a negative life event, they tend to make causal inferences about the event. These inferred causes affect the way people experience events and respond to them. Over time, whereas some people revisit events and rethink about them, shift towards more adaptive inferences, others may stay stuck in their initial negative inference.

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A new model of insight and a systematic review of measures

3 October, 2021
A new model of insight and a systematic review of measures

There is substantial research examining insight in psychotic disorders and in some nonpsychotic disorders. However, there has been little attention given to many nonpsychotic disorders. Research on insight in psychosis distinguishes between cognitive and clinical insight. In most studies examining insight in nonpsychotic disorders, definitions and assessments of insight vary significantly. The purpose of this review is to suggest a definition of insight in nonpsychotic disorders such that it can be used across different disorders.

In a new research PhD candidate Asala Halaj and prof. Jonathan Huppert systematically review the extant literature of insight in nonpsychotic disorders and analyze the assessments used in order to determine how well they capture these two types of insight. Then, they discuss how these two constructs can provide better understanding of the phenomenology of insight in nonpsychotic disorders.

Asala and Jonathan provide a multidimensional model of cognitive and clinical insight in nonpsychotic disorders, emphasizing the complexity of assessment and the importance of accurately defining insight. Such definitions have important theoretical and clinical implications, offering a better understanding of the concept of insight in nonpsychotic disorders.

See full article here